Henrik Ibsen

A Doll's House

Based on a translation by László Kúnos

Online tickets:

August
20
Tuesday
17:00
September
19
Thursday
20:00
October
7
Monday
20:00

Studio
RO
EN
14
1h 30' without intermission

Torvald Helmer
Péter Árus
 
Nora
Kinga Ötvös
 
Mrs. Linde
Csilla Albert
 
Krogstad
Loránd Váta
 
Dr. Rank
Gábor Viola
 
Anne-Marie
Melinda Kántor
 
Kiddo
Zsuzsa Tőtszegi
 
John the Courier
János Platz

directed by
Botond Nagy
 
text adaptation
Ágnes Kali, Botond Nagy
 
visual design
András Rancz
 
set design
Carmencita Brojboiu , András Rancz
 
dramaturg
Ágnes Kali
 
music and sound design
Bence Kónya-Ütő
 
choreography
Kinga Ötvös
 
digital graphics
Szidónia Szederjesi
 
director's assistant
Emőke Veres
 
light design
Romeo Groza
 
stage manager
Réka Zongor
 
costume design
Carmencita Brojboiu
Date of the opening: march 16, 2019

Being in a coma is being in a vulnerable state. It’s inertia. It’s marking time. The opposite of freedom. Human beings are prone to imprisoning themselves in lies, imaginary realities, old traumas, repetitive abuses. They tend to yield to coma-like states and powerlessly hope for miracles. But for how long can we hold ourselves captive? For how long can we embellish our solitary confinement with lies? And what happens if we wake up from this state of unconsciousness? If we realize that the miracle we are waiting for is just a gaping black hole that dissolves in holograms and ultimately leaves us to fend for ourselves?

Nóra realizes that the doll house she inhabits is getting increasingly narrower. That behind the embellished walls lie the recurring catatonic nightmares which she must fight if she wants to become a human being. If she wants to be free. With freedom comes sacrifice.

Awakening is a painful process, a swirling hypnosis. A tarantella. A fight, where cruelty finds you without accoutrements. Agamemnon sacrifices Iphigenia in order to win the war. And Nóra sacrifices her present in order to win her own wars. Nowadays, women spend several years in prison because they stand up for their rights. Nóra has done her time and can now leave her dollhouse.