Marin Držić

Dundo Maroje


Studio Performance in the Main Hall

Dundo Maroje
András Hatházi
 
Maro
Balázs Bodolai
 
Bokčilo
Lehel Salat
 
Popiva
Levente Molnár
 
Pera
Enikő Györgyjakab
 
Đivo
Róbert Laczkó Vass
 
Laura
Emőke Kató
 
Pera’s nurse
Csilla Varga
 
Laura's nurse
Éva Terschánszki
 
Petrunjela
Imola Kézdi
 
Hugo
Loránd Váta
 
Pomet Trpeza
Zsolt Bogdán
 
Tripčeta
Ervin Szűcs
 
Đivulin Lopuđanin
Csongor Köllő
 
Niko
Ferenc Sinkó
 
Pijero
Szabolcs Balla
 
Vlaho
Gábor Viola
 
Sadi
Loránd Farkas
 
Pavo
Attila Orbán
 
Dugi Nos, Captain
Áron Dimény
 
Gulisav, Gendarme
Nándor Vetési
 
Grubisa, Gendarme
András Buzási
 
Camillo, Gendarme
Alpár Fogarasi
 
Osterians
Tünde Skovrán, Júlia Albert, Júlia Laczó

directed by
Robert Raponja
 
set and costume design
Carmencita Brojboiu
 
dramaturg
András Visky
 
original music by
Massimo Brajković
 
choreography
Ferenc Sinkó
 
director's assistant
Ferenc Sinkó
 
prompter
Imola Kerezsy
 
stage manager
Imola Kerezsy

Date of the opening: február 01, 2011
Studio performance
Date of opening: 16 February 2011
Duration: 3 hours with one intermission

Translated by Zoltán Csuka
Marin Držić is the biggest Croatian comedy writer from the Renaissance and Dundo Maroje is his best known and most frequently performed comedy. It is a true masterpiece, a brilliant work of Croatian Renaissance literature in which the author presents Dubrovnik, its inhabitants and their lifestyle, in a humorous and ironic way. The plot is set in Rome, where Maro, a young man from Dubrovnik, is living and spending all his money on entertainment and easy living. Hearing about the wanton life Maro is leading in Rome, his father, Dundo Maroje, arrives hoping he can bring Maro to his senses and that his son will get back on track. The comedy Dundo Maroje is a fresco of one period of time and of a certain society. It is a world in which human virtues as well as faults are shown. Držić places the lust for money and wealth on one side, and the comfortable and licentious life of the merchants on the other. Out there, in a foreign country, “našijenci” (“our people”) seem forced to seek each other and depend on each other, because being a foreigner in an unknown country is a great risk for everybody.