After S. Anski

White Fire, Black Fire (DYBBUK)


Studio Performance in the Main Hall
2 hours.

The Mesulah
Miklós Bács
 
Hannan
Áron Dimény
 
Lea
Imola Kézdi
 
Reb Sender
Attila Orbán
 
Fradde
Réka Csutak
 
Reb Azriel
József Biró
 
Michael
Levente Molnár
 
Reb Shimshon
Zsolt Bogdán
 
Henekh
Róbert Laczkó Vass
 
Gittel
Melinda Kántor
 
Bassia
Edina M. Fodor
 
1st Batlen
Ernő Galló
 
2nd Batlen
Levente Molnár
 
3rd Batlen
András Buzási
 
Manashe
Ferenc Sinkó
 
Nahman
Lehel Salat
 
Manashe’s Mother
Andrea Kali
 
xxx
Attila Nagy
 
xxx
László Szekrényes
 
xxx
Alpár Fogarasi

directed by
David Zinder
 
set design
Miriam Guretzky
 
costume design
Miriam Guretzky
 
dramaturg
Kinga Kelemen
 
music composed by
Zsolt Lászlóffy
 
choreography
Yael Cramsky
 
masks
Attila Venczel
 
choreographer's assistant
Kinereth Kisch
 
stage manager
Yvonne Nagy
 
prompter
Zsófi Bálint

Date of the opening: May 01, 2002

Awards:
Romanian Theatre Union (UNITER) -  Nominated for the best performance of the year 2002 award
KÉZDI IMOLA - Best actress Award for 2002 (UNITER)

Press review


The word dybbuk is the hebrew word for "clinging" (ledavek) or "sticking". According to Hebrew belief, the dybbuk is a restless soul or bad spirit who moves into the body of a living being, and battles with its soul untill the possessed drifts into dementia.
Ansky's take place in 19th century eastern Europe. The play is the tragic  story of two lovers, Chanan, a young man absorbed by his studies and by Kabbala, and Leah, the girl chosen to be his wife. When the girl's father breaks his word and marries the girl to another man, Chanan dies. His soul is restless, and moves into Leah's body in order that he and Leah can still be together. Rabbi Asriel tries to exorcise the dybbuk from the anguished Leah, so that the girl can be married to the second man. Leah has to choose between the mundane marriage of duty, and the other-world bond with her dead lover's soul.
Opening date: May 17, 2002.
Running time: 2 hours.